Call for Submissions: Racial Ecologies

We are seeking papers for a collection of academic essays at the intersection of critical race theory and ecological criticism. Ideally, papers will engage the semiotics of race and nature, identity and place, culture and economy, and/or history and the future. To reframe Donna Haraway’s foundational critical questions in /Primate Visions/, we ask how do “the marks of race and [difference]” enable or disrupt ecocritical and cultural knowledges and possibilities in a “post racial,” late industrial society? How can we theorize and productively respond to the impact of racial formations on the environment, historically, and in the age of the Anthropocene? Our collection will draw on the long-standing critical and environmental activist work in Native American studies and on traditions of ecofeminist scholarship. Deadline to submit is January 12, 2015.

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Call for Submissions: Racial Ecologies
We are seeking papers for a collection of academic essays at the intersection of critical race theory and ecological criticism. Ideally, papers will engage the semiotics of race and nature, identity and place, culture and economy, and/or history and the future. To reframe Donna Haraway’s foundational critical questions in Primate Visions, we ask how do “the marks of race and [difference]” enable or disrupt ecocritical and cultural knowledges and possibilities in a “post racial,” late industrial society? How can we theorize and productively respond to the impact of racial formations on the environment, historically, and in the age of the Anthropocene? Our collection will draw on the long-standing critical and environmental activist work in Native American studies and on traditions of ecofeminist scholarship. At the same time, we are equally inspired by the renewed interest in the twin concerns of race and the environment exemplified by the recent American Quarterly (Sept. 2013) issue “Species/Race/Sex” which queries the distinctions drawn between human and non-human through close attention to the constitutive role of race and gender in bolstering that divide. We are soliciting submissions from both emerging and established scholars who are expanding the conversation around our current moment of ecological degradation by tracing an alternative history, by offering a clarifying perspective on the contemporary moment, or by addressing the possibilities of an alternative future.
 
While we take a broad view of the term “ecology,” including urban environments and agricultural systems, the collection will emphasize work that engages with the concept of “nature” in some way. We also encourage the submission of articles that address current and future threats to the environment.
 
Some examples of topics of interest to the editors include:
  • Utopian or dystopian speculative narratives
  • Apocalyptic narratives
  • Race and Ecocritical literature
  • Ecologies of migration and colonialism
  • Global perspectives of race and environment
  • Nationalism and environmental rhetoric
  • Food and agricultural justice
  • Critical race studies and urbanism
  • Environmental racism
  • Race and ecofeminism
We envision the final collection for use in upper-division undergraduate classrooms and as a resource for academics across a range of disciplines including American Studies, Anthropology, Communication, Cultural Studies, English, Ethnic Studies, Geography and Women and Gender Studies. We, therefore, encourage clear jargon-free prose accessible to people outside your academic field.
 
If you are interested in contributing to this collection, please submit the following by January 12th, 2015 to:
 
Kim Hester Williams (kim.hester.williams@sonoma.edu) and Leilani Nishime (nishime@uw.edu)
  • A 300-500 word abstract of your chapter. (Final articles will be approximately 6,000 words)
  • A current cv
  • A contact email address                                                                                                                    
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