Call for Papers, Special Issue - Critical Ethnic Studies

This special issue will bring together compelling discussions of corresponding and sometimes competing definitions of justice in critical ethnic studies. Each paper will respond to a set of questions designed to reveal the salient points of convergence and difference between intellectual/political traditions and approaches (e.g. Indigenous sovereignty, Black radical traditions, queer of color critique, Native feminisms, third world feminisms, Afropessimism, disability/crip studies, trans* and multigender theories, border and migration studies, critical refugee studies).  The submission deadline for this Fall 2016 special issue is September 30, 2015.

This special issue will bring together compelling discussions of corresponding and sometimes competing definitions of justice in critical ethnic studies. Each paper will respond to a set ofquestions designed to reveal the salient points of convergence and difference between intellectual/political traditions and approaches (e.g. Indigenous sovereignty, Black radical traditions, queer of color critique, Native feminisms, third world feminisms, Afropessimism, disability/crip studies, trans* and multigender theories, border and migration studies, critical refugee studies).

This Special Issue Co-Editors are: Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang.


Perhaps because it is a term not always treated with respect in the academy, “justice” is used frequently but rarely defined. Much goes unsaid about what is meant by justice, but when considered from the perspectives of different communities and their concerns, justice takes on varying and sometimes contradictory meanings. Justice for one group may mean greater integration and mobility within a nation-
state whereas for another group that definition may be regarded as problematic.

This special issue considers possibilities for contingent collaborations and highlights important departures which emerge when we theorize deeply what justice wants. Authors will consider the imperatives and aims of justice by attending to the roots of injustice, the contours of theory and knowing, and pathways to justice within their intellectual traditions.

Prior to publication, authors will share abstracts/outlines and be encouraged to identify points of saliency and divergence in ideas and aims. Questions pertaining to the roles of the state, citizenship, representation, voice, sovereignty, recognition, reconciliation, and futurity might thread through each of the papers, as authors theorize what justice wants.

Consider the following questions (but please don’t necessarily use them to organize your paper)

1. Please say a few words about the intellectual/political tradition/approach that you will engage in the paper. Of course, you are invited to address one or several.

2. (Considering the history and radical futurities of these intellectual traditions) What does justice want? What are the imperatives and aims of justice?

3. What are the roots of injustice?

4. What contours of theory and knowing are relevant?

5. What are the salient pathways to justice?

6. What are the roles of (select whichever apply/appeal) the state, citizenship, representation, voice, sovereignty, recognition, reconciliation, theories of the future?

7. What are some of the incommensurabilities between these desires of justice, and the desires of justice from other standpoints, traditions/approaches?

8. What questions do you have for other authors who will write for this special issue?


Critical Ethnic Studies provides a space for unique and insurgent critique among academic and activist intellectuals within ethnic studies. It invites interdisciplinary works that reposition the guiding assumptions of other fields, and engage the new methodologies, philosophies, and
propositions of this emerging intellectual formation. It recognizes that distinct fields have been collapsed in the institutionalization of Ethnic Studies in universities, and presses back against equivocations which domesticate critique and action.

The Journal encourages and enacts several related, multilayered lines of inquiry. First, this journal questions the nation state model, paying attention to the present manifestations of colonialism, extra-national effects of globalization and privatization, as well as structural redevelopment programs on Indigenous people and people of color.

Second, this journal appraises the productive tensions between fields that have institutionalized together under the umbrella of Ethnic Studies. Particularly, Indigenous Studies has attended to ongoing settler colonialism and ongoing Indigenous resistance to occupation and erasure, whereas Ethnic Studies has often been vexed by the ways in which discussions of race, civil rights, immigration, labor exploitation, and inclusion may ignore settler colonialism.

Third, by explicitly foregrounding white supremacy as a logic and social formation intimately abetted by race and racism, the journal provide trenchant critiques of how and why race, racism, and antiblackness persist and not merely state or describe their persistence.

Fourth, the journal reflects intersectional, feminist and queer analyses that treat categories such as race, class, gender, and sexuality not as additive modes of identity, oppression, or discrimination—but rather as constitutive, as robust analytics for critically apprehending and  theorizing alternatives.

The journal is published bi-annually by the University of Minnesota Press.

For more information about the journal:
www.criticalethnicstudies.org/critical-ethnic-studies-journal

For subscription rates:
www.upress.umn.edu/journal-division/Journals/critical-ethnic-studies-ces

Journal subscription is also included with CESA membership:
www.criticalethnicstudies.org/membership

 

Category: 

Share this post